Common Corners

LAWRENCE C EARLE
His Published Life

Artists of Grand Rapids

Early Grand Rapids Years

Marinus Harting

Kent Base Ball Club

When They Were Boys

Palestine Exhibition Company

Art In Chicago

Paintings By
Mr. Lawrence C. Earle

Brush & Pencil

Grand Rapids
Artists and Writers

Carter Times -
Dutch Boy Painter

Robert L. Stearns

Artist Paints Types
of Kingdom Come

Latest Portrait:
Mrs. Van Sluyters

Earle's Pictures are
Mountain Portraits

Exhibits New Work

Good Art in High
Class Movie Film

Motion Picture Classic
magazine cover 1916

Paints Portrait of
YWCA Helper

Lawrence C. Earle,
Distinguished Artist,
Dies at Friend's Door

Garfield Gives
Reminiscence of
Artist L. C. Earle

Dutch Boy Painter
Vol. XV Number 2
March 1922

Commemorative

 

 

LAWRENCE C. EARLE,
DISTINGUISHED ARTIST,
DIES AT FRIEND'S DOOR

NOTED PAINTER SUCCUMBS TO
STROKE OF APOPLEXY-ON
WAY TO DINNER

NEWS OF SUDDEN PASSING
SHOCK TO COMMUNITY

  Lawrence C. Earle, internationally famed as an artist and one of the city's most distinguished citizens, died here suddenly last night, when he was stricken with apoplexy while on his way to an affair planned in his honor by friends. He was 76 years of age.

  Mr. Earle fell unconscious to steps leading to the home of Frank Forsyth, 242 Jefferson ave. SE., and died unseen by passersby. At the Forsyth home, a dozen guests had assembled for a tea given in honor of the aged artist. Wondering at his delay, friends were ignorant of his death until shortly after 7 o'clock when a man passing the home knocked on the door and informed Mr. Forsyth.

  Miss Jane Barker, long an acquaintance of Mr. Earle, was among the first to his side and discovered life had gone. The body was carried into the home and physicians summoned. The body was later removed to the Birdsall undertaking rooms, at Jefferson ave. and State st., SE.

  Mr. Earle was born in New York City Nov. 11, 1845, and came to Grand Rapids with his father when he was 12 years of age. He returned to New York in 1866, where for several years he studied and painted, moving from there to Chicago, where he opened a studio and painted until the disastrous fire of 1871. From there he went to Europe and, after several years of study and work in Munich, Florence, Paris and other European cities, returned to America and made his home at Montclair, N. J. In 1885 he was married to Miss Helen Harmon.

  In 1909, after the death of his wife, Mr. Earle returned to Grand Rapids to live and has made this city his residence since.

  Mr. Earle was an honorary member of the Association of the National Academy and recognized at the heighth of his renown as the leading water color painter of America. His works are now exhibited at the New York National Academy, among the civic collection of Peoria, Ill., at the National museum at Washington, D. C., and in many private collections in many art centers of the country.

  Grand Rapids is fortunate in having many of his finest works. The Peninsular club, of which he had been made an honorary life member, possesses some of his best canvasses. The portraits for which he was justly famed hang in private collections of Philo C. Fuller, Judge Wanty, Gen. B. S. Pierce, Mr. Butterworth, Mrs. Isabelle Putnam, Mrs. Edyth Mansfield, Mrs. Guy W. Rouse, Ralph Widdicomb and Mrs. Emily J. Clark.

  Mr. Earle is survived by two sons, Lawrence H. Earle of New York city and John H. Earle of Redding, Pa; and two sisters, Mrs. Grace Harrison of Santiago, Calif., and Miss Kate Earle of 226 Union ave., SE., with whom he made his home. Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Earle of Fountain st., NE., were his cousins.

  Private service will be held at the residence Wednesday afternoon, at a time to be announced later.

THE GRAND RAPIDS HERALD, MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 21, 1921

 

*Thanks to Dr. J. Gray Sweeney for permission to use material from
Artists of Grand Rapids 1840-1980, J. Gray Sweeney; Grand Rapids, 1981:
The Grand Rapids Art Museum, The Grand Rapids Public Museum

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